Toddler Thursday – The Boy Who Cried Bigfoot

The Boy Who Cried Bigfoot
Scott Magoon
To be released: Feb 5, 2013

I think we’re all familiar with the Boy Who Cried Wolf.

Goodreads says: A classic tale with a timeless message gets a hugely hilarious twist.He’s big. He’s funny. He’s not real. Or IS he?  The Boy Who Cried Bigfoot!

This clever twist on “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” is told from the point of view of an unexpected narrator and, through snappy text and lighthearted illustrations, demonstrates the value of telling the truth, the importance of establishing trust, and (of course!) the possibility that a beast you created to get attention can become a real-life friend.

Advertisements

Waiting on Wednesday – Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Ideology of Domesticity by Marilyn Francus

“Waiting on Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we’re really excited about.

Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Ideology of Domesticity
by Marilyn Francus
To be released Dec 3, 2012

Goodreads says: Although credited with the rise of domesticity, eighteenth-century British culture singularly lacked narratives of good mothers, ostensibly the most domestic of females. With startling frequency, the best mother was absent, disembodied, voiceless, or dead. British culture told tales almost exclusively of wicked, surrogate, or spectral mothers–revealing the defects of domestic ideology, the cultural fascination with standards and deviance, and the desire to police maternal behaviors.Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Ideology of Domesticity

“Monstrous Motherhood” analyzes eighteenth-century motherhood in light of the inconsistencies among domestic ideology, narrative, and historical practice. If domesticity was so important, why is the good mother’s story absent or peripheral? What do the available maternal narratives suggest about domestic ideology and the expectations and enactment of motherhood? By focusing on literary and historical mothers in novels, plays, poems, diaries, conduct manuals, contemporary court cases, realist fiction, fairy tales, satire, and romance, Marilyn Francus reclaims silenced maternal voices and perspectives. She exposes the mechanisms of maternal marginalization and spectralization in eighteenth-century culture and revises the domesticity thesis.

“Monstrous Motherhood” will compel scholars in eighteenth-century studies, women’s studies, family history, and cultural studies to reevaluate a foundational assumption that has driven much of the discourse in their fields.

What are you waiting for?

Waiting on Wednesday – Pivot Point by Kasie West

“Waiting on Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we’re really excited about.

Pivot Point
Kasie West
To be released February 12, 2013

Pivot PointGoodreads says: Addison Coleman’s life is one big “What if?” As a Searcher, whenever Addie is faced with a choice, she can look into the future and see both outcomes. It’s the ultimate insurance plan against disaster. Or so she thought. When Addie’s parents ambush her with the news of their divorce, she has to pick who she wants to live with–her father, who is leaving the paranormal compound to live among the “Norms,” or her mother, who is staying in the life Addie has always known. Addie loves her life just as it is, so her answer should be easy. One Search six weeks into the future proves it’s not.

In one potential future, Addie is adjusting to life outside the Compound as the new girl in a Norm high school where she meets Trevor, a cute, sensitive artist who understands her. In the other path, Addie is being pursued by the hottest guy in school–but she never wanted to be a quarterback’s girlfriend. When Addie’s father is asked to consult on a murder in the compound, she’s unwittingly drawn into a dangerous game that threatens everything she holds dear. With love and loss in both lives, it all comes down to which reality she’s willing to live through…and who she can’t live without.

Adrienne says: Oooh. Dystopian! No vampires! WINNING. And look at that gorgeous cover!

Time to talk of cabbages and kings..

Thanksgiving week is busy for people in the US.

First, we will prove to every other civilized country that we are gluttonous, wasteful, lazy creatures. As someone who eats almost as much as she reads, I am very excited about my impeding date with turkey, mashed potatoes, rolls, cranberry sauce (the real stuff, not the jello-like substance from the can), chicken and noodles, appetizers, various desserts.. Mmmm. Thankfully my family is huge so after a few hours there’s nothing left when we regain consciousness from our gravy-coma. See? Lazy and gluttonous, but not wasteful. Breaking stereotypes!

WAIT. First, we all travel. Wednesday is the biggest travel day of the year. Traffic is going to be cray-cray.

First, travel. Second, eating. Third, showing up at the Walmart (because we will be in the middle of nowhere with no other options) at 8pm for Black Friday sales. Yes. 8pm Thursday for Black Friday sales. I do not plan on doing this. I actually try to avoid these sales. And I prefer Cyber Monday. My mom and I have started a habit of going to antique stores on Black Friday. It’s nice to not wrestle people over old children’s books and teacups.

What do you need when you know you’re going to be in the car 15+ hours?

BOOKS. (And snacks. And don’t forget some water, we don’t want you to get dehydrated. We CARE about you.)

Here’s what I’m taking to read
The Book of Unholy Mischief – Elle Newmark
Tell the Wolves I’m Home – Carol Rifka
The Roots of the Olive Tree – Courtney Miller Santo

 

In other news, you may be seeing more of me next month. Unfortunately, this is because of budget cuts that have resulted in me becoming unemployed in a few weeks. I’ve been spending my free time applying to all sorts (ALL SORTS) of jobs. I think that a major roadblock is how people perceive librarians. There’s still the belief that we went to school to learn how to stamp due dates. In reality we’re on top of the latest technologies, we have excellent organizational and research skills, we left school with marketing experience, we teach our patrons/clients constantly… our skills can be used in nearly any profession.

Ideally, I will be offered a position at my local public library. However, those positions are few and far between (I’ve applied to ~20 jobs in the last few days. Less than 5 were in a library.) and the area is saturated with people who have the MLS. I’ve been applying to a lot of positions that want a slightly different degree, but ask for all of the skills I possess. I hope that I (and others in the area) can generate a paradigm shift and employers will see that we’re valuable employees who can meet their challenges. *steps off soapbox* Thank you for listening.

 

Waiting on Wednesday – A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

“Waiting on Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we’re really excited about.

A Tale for the Time Being
Ruth Ozeki
To be released March 12, 2013

Goodreads says: “A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be.”

A Tale for the Time BeingIn Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine.

Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.

Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.

A quick recommendation.

I love books with strong female characters. Ladies who don’t whine about how much they miss their boo. Ladies who are willing to do what needs to be done instead of grabbing a Hershey bar and hiding in their bedroom watching Lifetime. Ladies who seize their opportunities and refuse to submit to what society offers them.

Today I offer you (and hope you’ll seize the opportunity to enjoy) Maria V. Snyder.

Do you enjoy the exploits of Alanna? Did you root for Sabriel? Did you want to go kick some ass with Katniss?

Then please. Do yourself a favor and pick up Poison Study. Might as well grab the rest of the trilogy while you’re at it. And if you want to save yourself a trip, go ahead and get Storm Glass. It’s the first book in the next trilogy.

But don’t take my word for it. Goodreads tells me that has over 35K ratings. It’s sitting at a comfortable 4.2/5.

Goodreads says: Choose: A quick death…Or slow poison…

About to be executed for murder, Yelena is offered an extraordinary reprieve. She’ll eat the best meals, have rooms in the palace—and risk assassination by anyone trying to kill the Commander of Ixia.

Poison Study (Study, #1)And so Yelena chooses to become a food taster. But the chief of security, leaving nothing to chance, deliberately feeds her Butterfly’s Dust—and only by appearing for her daily antidote will she delay an agonizing death from the poison.

As Yelena tries to escape her new dilemma, disasters keep mounting. Rebels plot to seize Ixia and Yelena develops magical powers she can’t control. Her life is threatened again and choices must be made. But this time the outcomes aren’t so clear…

 

 

Waiting on Wednesday – The Ocean At The End Of The Lane by Neil Gaiman

“Waiting on Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we’re really excited about.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane
Neil Gaiman
To be released June 18, 2013

The Ocean at the End of the Lane Goodreads says: It began for our narrator forty years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed. Dark creatures from beyond the world are on the loose, and it will take everything our narrator has just to stay alive: there is primal horror here, and menace unleashed – within his family and from the forces that have gathered to destroy it.

His only defense is three women, on a farm at the end of the lane. The youngest of them claims that her duckpond is an ocean. The oldest can remember the Big Bang.

 

Adrienne says: I dearly love Neil Gaiman. I decided to try American Gods after I found out that he wrote episodes of Doctor Who. I love his writing style.